Who lived around Glascote Locks in 1911

When I’m researching local history I find it useful to log everyone who llived in the area on a particular date. From this starting point I can dig deeper to investigate each family. This exercise confirmed that Anchor Row was also referred to as Anchor Yard. After Bamford Street and Bamford House. the next property is the Wharf House, so it is very likely that the enumerator proceeded down the east bank of the canal and listed each property, then continued clockwise to the pair of top lock cottages, before moving on the the Anchor Inn, the cottages in front of it, and Anchor Row behind it. Here are the residents in the area as listed in the 1911 census:

Wharf House – a four room cottage (no longer exists)

George William Matthews, age 43, a canal worker, labouring and repairing, his wife Minnie, age 43, and three of their five surviving children, (one had died and two were away from home), Middleton, age 9, Robert, age 7, and Kate, age 4.

The Locks – a five room cottage (now Bottom Lock Cottage)

Arthur Croshaw, age 50, a canal labourer, his wife Emma, age 46, and six of their eight surviving children (one had died young): Albert, age 20, a market gardener, Emma, age 17,  a cotton polisher at the tape mill, Arthur, age 15, a potter in the stoneware bottle department at the sanitary pipe works, Thomas, Walter and Dora.

The Canal Office – a five room cottage (probably now 1 Lock Cottage, at the top lock)

John Morgan, age 62, a canal toll clerk working from home for the Coventry Canal Company, his wife Mary Ann, age 58, and one of their two surviving children (five had died young), Edgar, age 23, a wages clerk for the Fisher and Co Paper Mill. Although Edgar was of the right age to serve in WW1, as yet I have not been able to identify a sevice record for him.

The Locks – a four room property (probably now 2 Lock Cottage, at the top lock)

Peter Allsop, age 59, a widower, Toll Clerk for the Coventry Canal Company, and three of his five surviving children (six had died young): Arthur, age 27, an iron moulder, Alice, age 23, a tape weaver, Ruth, age 18, and his grandsons Frederick Allsop, age 12, and Reginald Allsop, age 5.

The Anchor Inn (now the Co-op)

William Heathcote, age 67, a licensed victualler, his wife Ann, age 73, Jenny Bath, one of his eight surviving children (two had died young), age 32, and her husband Emanuel Bath, age 38, a chimney pot maker, and their son Albert Bath, age 5.

148 Glascote Road – a four room cottage (no longer exists, the Co-op uses this number)

Arthur Shadrack Frost, age 28, a waggoner, his wife Emily, age 25, and their children May, age 2, and baby Arthur, age 1 month.

150 Glascote Road – a four room cottage (no longer exists)

Harry Heathcote, age 35, a clay worker in the sanitary ware works, his wife Eliza, age 32, and their children, Albert, age 12, and Emanuel, age 9.

3 Anchor Row – a four room cottage (no longer exists)

Frank Lees, age 27, a coal miner (hewer), his wife Jessie, age 24, a tape weaver, and a visitor, Annie Maria Lycett, age 28, who worked in the local firelighter factory.

4 Anchor Row – a four room cottage (no longer exists)

Thomas Lycett, age 36, a coal miner (hewer), his wife Emily, age 36, and their five surviving children (one had died young): Richard, age 13, a clay worker at the Terracotta Works, Nellie, Robert, Thomas and Frank.

5 Anchor Row – a three room cottage (no longer exists)

David Hassall Owen, age 26, a colliery worker (road) below ground, his wife Annie Elizabeth, age 28, and their two surviving children, 3 year old Edgar and 11 month old David (two children had died young).

6 Anchor Row – a three room cottage (no longer exists)

Thomas Burton, age 78, a carter, his wife Elizabeth, age 64, and a boarder, William Ward, age 45, a colliery banksman (above ground). Thomas and Elizabeth had only been married for 7 years.

7 Anchor Row – a three room cottage (no longer exists)

James Henry Smith, age 32, a road repairer below ground, his wife Emma, age 35, and their five children, William, Frederick, Clarence, Edna, and 10 month old Florence.

8 Anchor Row – a three room cottage (no longer exists)

Thomas Chapman, age 33, a bricklayer’s labourer for a builder, his wife Alice Maud, age 31, and their five surviving children, George, Dorothy, Margaret, Thomas, and Elizabeth, (two children had died young).

9 and 10 Anchor Row – four rooms (no longer exists)

William Kinson, age 67, a market gardener’s labourer, his wife Elizabeth, age 63, a tailoress working at home, and three of their eight surviving children (five had died), Albert, a labourer in the iron foundry, Minnie, a tailoress in a clothing factory, and Florrie, a domestic servant.

11 Anchor Row – a four room cottage (no longer exists)

William Faulkner, age 65, a general labourer for a builder, his wife Frances, age 65, her brother Jarvis Ward, age 55, a coal hewer, and his son William Ward, age 14, who was employed below ground in the mine (boy on wire)

144 Glascote Road (no longer exists)

The Day family.

Even numbers descending thereafter. None exist today until number 112 (Next Place Estate Agents)

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