Elderkin on Convict Ships

George Elderkin

George Elderkin was born in Southwark in about 1824 and was 24 years old, 5 feet 2 inches tall, with a fresh complexion, medium sized head, sandy hair, an oval face, a medium forehead, sandy eyebrows, brown eyes, a turned up nose, medium mouth, a small chin, and had several small moles on his arms. He was protestant and could read and write. He was a labourer and he was single. He was convicted of larceny, with a previous conviction, at the Central Criminal Court on 31st January 1848. The newspaper reported:

“LAMBETH. Henry Elson and George Elderkin, two well-dressed young fellows, were placed at the bar before Mr. Elliott, on a charge of stealing various sets of bagatelle balls from public-houses and beer-shops. The prisoner Elson was also charged with stealing 20l., the property of his late employer. Two clear cases were selected, and from the evidence in these, it appeared that on Wednesday week the prisoners entered the Nag’s Head public-house, John-street, Clerkenwell, and immediately after they left a set of bagatelle balls, with which they had been playing, were missed. Saturday last they went into a beer-shop in Gravel-lane, Wapping, and carried away from there another set of bagatelle balls, which they offered to pledge on the same evening at Lambeth. Mr. Greenhouse, the pawnbroker, having no doubt that the property had been stolen, sent for policeman, but the prisoners escaped, leaving the property behind them. They were, however, subsequently taken into custody, but before he was secured Elderkin made a desperate resistance, and made a violent attempt to secure a knife to injure the constable. It was further proved in evidence, that the prisoner Elderkin had been tried the Old Bailey, when there were no less than four distinct charges of stealing bagatelle balls brought against him, and he was then sentenced to six months’ imprisonment. The prisoners committed on both the above charges. A third charge was preferred against Elson of stealing 20f., the property of the late Mr. Fry, landlord of the Coburg Arms public-house, in William-street, Waterloo-road.”

(Source: Morning Advertiser – Saturday 29 January 1848, via British Newspaper Archive).

He was sentenced to transpostation for a term of seven years. He arrived in Tasmania on 3rd October 1850. On 10th May 1854 he falsely represented himself to be a constable, and was further sentenced to hard labour.

Robert Elderkin

Robert Elderkin from Bourne, Lincolnshire, was convicted at the Lincolnshire (Parts of Kesteven) 2nd Session on 6th October 1789 and was sentenced to transportation for seven years.

Robert was transported to New South Wales on the convict ship Admiral Barrington, under the command of Robert Abbon Marsh. The ship sailed from Portsmouth, England, on 27th March 1791 as part of the third fleet and arrived in Port Jackson, New South Wales on 16th October. She brought with her Captain William Paterson, three noncommissioned officers, and 24 privates of the New South Wales Corps. They served as guards for the 300 male convicts on board. In addition, four free women accompanied their convict husbands, together with two children. Ninety-seven persons were sick on board the ship when she arrived. Thirty-six convicts died during the voyage, and 264 susvived the voyage.

William Elderkin

William Elderkin was born in 1749 in Herefordshire or Hertfordshire. He was convicted in Bedford on 5th March 1807 and sentenced to transportation for life. He was transported to New South Wales on the convict ship Admiral Gambier under Captain Harrison. He arrived in December 1808. He was given a Ticket of Leave on 2nd December 1810 and was disposed of to a tailor in George Street, Sidney. He became a tailor. He was pardoned on 31st January 1920. He was five feet eleven inches tall, with a ruddy complexion, brown and grey hair, and hazel eyes.

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