Bern Agreement Greece Turkey

“. It is clear that there was no obligation to submit to the Court of Justice without a special agreement, since the following paragraph indicated that the two Prime Ministers had decided to expedite the meeting of experts on the question of the Continental Shelf of the Aegean Sea” (ibid.). In accordance with the decision of the Security Council and in view of the Court`s rejection of the Greek accusation and the Greek claims, Turkey and Greece signed an agreement in Bern on 11 November 1976. Within the framework of this agreement, the parties decided to enter into negotiations with a view to reaching an agreement on the delimitation of the continental shelf. They also undertook to refrain from any initiative or action concerning the continental eleven of the Aegean Sea. The dispute over the continental shelf (CS) results from the absence of a delimitation agreement between the two countries and affects the overall balance of rights and interests in the Aegean Sea, given that these are territories attributable to Turkey and Greece beyond the 6-mile coastal sea. In the past, the CS issue has created tensions between Turkey and Greece. Following Turkey`s scientific research in 1976, Greece appealed to both the United Nations Security Council and the International Court of Justice (ICJ). On 10 August 27, 1976, Greece sent a communication to the President of the Security Council and followed up on an emergency meeting of the Council on the grounds that “the recent flagrant violations of greece`s sovereign rights by Turkey on the continental shelf of the Aegean Sea have created a dangerous situation that threatens international peace and security”.

On 11 September 1976, the International Court of Justice rejected the Greek request for provisional provisional measures. The Court also held that areas outside territorial waters were indeed “at issue”. Subsequently, in 1978, the Court decided that it did not have jurisdiction to rule on the merits of the Greek action. In accordance with the decision of the Security Council and in view of the Court`s rejection of the Greek accusation and the Greek claims, Turkey and Greece signed an agreement in Bern on 11 November 1976. Within the framework of this agreement, the parties decided to enter into negotiations with a view to reaching an agreement on the delimitation of the continental shelf. They also undertook to refrain from any initiative or action concerning the continental eleven of the Aegean Sea. The Berne Agreement of 1976 remains valid and its conditions remain binding on both countries. This means that negotiations on the content of the issue of the continental shelf were “given priority” and, in this context, nothing was said “or on the negotiation of a special agreement” to refer the matter to the Court (ibid.). It also draws attention to Greece`s subsequent efforts to ensure the negotiation of such an agreement as confirmation of the accuracy of the Turkish interpretation of the communiqué (para. .

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